Inventum receives WiFi Leadership Awards 2019

Inventum Technologies has been conferred with the 3nd My India WiFi India Leadership Award 2019 for  “Best WiFi OSS/BSS  Solution” at the recently concluded My India WiFi Summit & Awards 2019 at The Imperial Hotel, New Delhi on Aug. 20, 2019 organised by DigiAnalysys.

This award recognizes Inventum as one of the top most OSS/BSS Solution provider in India. This is Inventum second year in a row. Inventum had received  My India WiFi India Leadership Award 2018 for “Best Cloud WiFi Solution”.

Mr. Anil Walia (extreme left), CSMO, Inventum, receiving the award from Mr. TR Dua (centre), Director General, TAIPA  accompanied by Mr. Pradeep Kushwah (extreme right), Marketing Manager, Inventum 

The awards ceremony was attended by imminent industry leaders including Dinesh Tyagi, CEO, CSC SPV; Sarvesh Singh, CMD, BBNL; A Seshagiri Rao, CMD, TCIL; Vipin Tyagi, Executive Director, C-DOT; K Alagesan, CMD, ITI and many other dignitary.

Mr. Sachin Mehra (extreme left), CEO Inventum, receiving the award for “Best Cloud WiFi Solution” from Mr. Anuj Jain   (centre), President, Reliance Jio accompanied by Mr. Anil Walia (extreme right), CSMO, Inventum

 Speaking on the event, Mr. Anil Walia, Chief Sales Officer, Inventum, says “We are delighted to receive the My India WiFi India Leadership Award 2019 for Best WiFi OSS/BSS Solution category. This coveted award is result of our continous efforts of improving  ISPs & WISPs customers experience and  providing them a end-to-end solution.”

Inventum’s UNIFY is a complete stack of billing & operations management (B/OSS) software. The key modules for the stack includes AAA, Subscriber CRM, Financial Accounting, Prepay & Postpaid Billing, Reseller Management, Electronic Wallet System and many more.

Inventum is a leading provider of fixed & wireless data networks technology with a strong made in India portfolio. Inventum builds routers, cloud solution, security and software systems that power some of the world’s largest communication networks. Inventum products are used by mobile operators, FTTH providers, ISP, Wi-Fi hotspots, Airports, Hospitality, Convention Centres and Smart Cities.

My India WiFi India Awards were instituted by DigiAnalysys Media in 2017 to recognise and celebrate visionary enterprises across industry segments and to focus on highlighting key trends and technologies in the WiFi segment.

ISP Routers built for Africa launched at ICT Expo 2019 Kigali

A range of routers suited for the African ISP industry were launched at the recently concluded India-Africa ICT Expo 2019. Indian vendor Inventum showcased both its hardware & virtual router products at the event.

Inventum Solution for ICT Africa 2019

Inventum believes that it’s extensive experience with ISP, WISP, hotspots and Smart Cities in India will translate well for African customers who face similar challenges.

Inventum Booth at India Africa ICR 2019
Inventum at India Africa ICT 2019, Kigali, Rwanda

“We are a trusted made in India brand with 2 decades of proven experience in developing hardware and software solutions for the ISP & telecom sector which we believe is ideal for Africa…” said Mr. Anil Walia, Chief Sales Officer, Inventum.

Presently Inventum offers a range of high speed routers, BNG, WAG, cyber security and Wi-Fi access point products. The company also provides OSS/BSS, AAA, Postpaid & prepay billing products.

Inventum Participation at ICT Africa conference
Conference at India Africa ICT 2019, Kigali, Rawanda
Inventum at India-Africa ICT 2019 show held in Kigali, Rwanda

Why virtual routers?

Most of us are familiar with routers. The little black boxes sitting in the corner of our home or office with messy wires sticking out. 

What is not common knowledge is that routers come in many shapes & sizes. Home Wi-Fi routers that are good for small number of devices and large enterprise routers that serve thousands of users. Costs also vary significantly with home routers costing a few dollars while enterprise models run into the thousands. 

No matter which category of router you fall in, it’s always hard to differentiate from the myriad choices. This is where virtual routers come in, with no hardware purchase and costing next to nothing. 

What are virtual routers?

Virtual routers are software routers that use a normal PC (or server) to do their job. 

With the advent of software defined networking (SDN) many functions of the modern enterprise are being virtualised to save cost and vendor lock-in. This is also referred to as NFV or network function virtualisation. In simple terms, functions that were performed by dedicated networking devices are now performed by software running on commercial-off-the-shelf servers (COTS).

 

The VSR

Inventum’s VSR is a virtual router that can replace any hardware router. The VSR software automatically detects the PC hardware and sets it up to function as a router. Connect your Internet & LAN to the relevant ports of the PC and voila! 

Performance

Performance of your virtual router really depends on your PC hardware. Depending on the number of CPU cores, memory and network cards virtual routers can easily handle multi-gigabit traffic. Advances from Intel® in multi-core processors and the DPDK framework have enabled network fast-paths on commodity servers.

Inventum has combined these developments with its own optimised software to build virtual routers that can deliver millions of packets per second (mpps) on Intel® Atom® & Xeon® processors. 

Go Virtual

If you haven’t yet dabbled with network function virtulization (NFV) the virtual router may be the first thing to try.

Fire up a machine on the cloud or use a hypervisor on-prem, the virtual router can address every use case that a physical router can. No lock-in to proprietary hardware and no expensive maintenance contracts. 

Download and try the VSR today!

Digital India, an entrepreneur’s perspective

Back in 1983, I fell in love with computing on the BBC Micro & the Sinclair ZX Spectrum+. Having access to a computer was a small miracle back then. What was cooler was that the computer at school, a SCL Unicorn (clone of the BBC Micro) was made by Semiconductor Complex Limited Chandigarh, Punjab. The micro was legendary & my fellow enthusiasts may recall that today’s popular ARM architecture had its genesis on one of these very puppies.

Fast forward 30 years and India’s electronics import bill is poised to over take oil, topping $400 billion by 2020.

How did we get here? How does a nation that launches missions to Mars become a relative nobody in the high-tech electronics (ESDM) space.

The Services Gold Rush

We can’t build them, but we can programme them. And programme we did. Infosys, Wipro & HCL are stuff of legend. They got the country hard earned dollars in dark times. The brightest emigrated, most ending up in silicon valley where alongside the Chinese they dominated.

And while we got the gold, at home we forgot about the hardware bits – Research, Design, Development & real innovation. I guess that was relegated to government run ISRO, DRDO & other similar institutions.

Mamla Risky Hai (Matters of Risk)

The Israelis have made a fine art of creating, growing and then harvesting multi billion dollar tech companies. At the heart of their success lies a strong will, the right eco-system, risk capital, experience and serious R&D. The Chief Scientists’ Office (CSO) of Israel plays a central role in startups, providing capital, forging joint ventures, incubating & nurturing. Above all, the CSO is very protective of Israeli Intellectual Property.

India has no CSO equivalent, but has excellent talent (IIT aside) and daring entrepreneurs. Then why aren’t we seeing world beating Indian product companies in high tech? I believe a lot has to do with the lack of high risk capital for investment in basic research which is crucial to invention, creative destruction.

The truth is that tech services is a sure shot, building networking equipment for telecom or defence is not. Our financial apparatus including banks, private conglomerates, venture funds & the government really don’t like risk unless they can own and control it.

A conversation I had with one of India’s telecom Tzars many moons ago for for investing in telecom equipment startups summarised the sentiment “telecom is about regulation, not technology… our job is to manage regulation, sales & marketing; the tech we have outsourced to the Americans & Chinese…”.

It is no wonder then that despite being the second largest mobile market on the planet, we do not have a single Huawei, Cisco or Ericsson of our own. The gain of our mobile operators from sweetheart deals delivered by foreign vendors and their Exim banks ensured that any Indian innovation in core telecom products was killed off. A tragedy, considering a large part of our $400 bn import bill in 2020 originates from telecom. Those iPhones really add up quickly.

Risk capital is not available to Digital India entrepreneurs period. What you can get is high interest debt. Schemes of the government are dysfunctional, impractical targeting a few lacs to get you started, but how does one compete with Cisco & Huawei? Almost all tech VC funds are foreign and the flavour of the month seems to be E-Commerce. So how do $1-5 million revenue companies in Digital India access capital without pledging their homes?

Government Stimulus

Would India be a market leader in auto components had it not been for Maruti? Probably not. And what of India’s IT boom without the early income tax exemptions. And what of our crony capitalist, none of whom would have existed without government patronage.

So why is ESDM the bastard child? Maybe ESDM was missing its crony!

The most recent meaningful regulation in ESDM has been PMA. DeITy notified the Preference to Domestically Manufactured Electronics Goods (PMA) in 2013. The policy promotes Indian goods by reserving part of government tenders for local companies. No concession on specifications or quality, only exemptions from tender conditions like “must have 5,000 cr net profit for the last 3 years”; after all which Indian company has that! PMA was instantly opposed by COAI, probably because private telecom operators were made party to it. Their chief argument was that Indian companies cannot ever make telecom gear. It eludes me as to why potentially the biggest sponsors of telecom ESDM would oppose PMA. And while PMA was diluted to apply only to PSU purchases, it did yield immediate results with two silicon fabs being announced.

For me, the government’s message to foreign vendors was loud & clear – India no longer wants to sell services at $50/hour, we want a piece of the Intellectual Property pie, to be registered, manufactured & taxed here.

What Indian companies need are many more policies like PMA. More government stimulus, capital & industry sponsorship. Defence must participate too.

Make in India

Nothing is easy to make in India. Its hard enough to set up an office, let alone build a product. Being an Indian entrepreneur reminds me of the video game Asteroids, fragments of menacing celestial bodies coming at you in full force from all directions. Patience is crucial to persevere.

And then Modi’s Make in India happened, Digital India happened. He put sexy back into making hardware. He did in 3 words what we had struggled to do for decades. There is hope.

I believe the road is going to be long and arduous. We need to sort out our labour laws, manufacturing, incentives, logistics, taxes, ancillary industries, human resources, IPR laws and so much more. And while foreign vendors like Cisco are already taking advantage, its the smaller Indian entrepreneurs that need to be empowered to drive this revolution.

With Mr. Modi on his way to Silicon Valley to woo the diaspora, my question is, who is listening to the little guys at home.

 

 

Full disclosure – I work for Inventum, one of the only carrier-class Indian router makers. The company provides Broadband RAS, Service Routers, Billing & Provisioning systems for telecom, enterprises, education & hospitality. The views expressed here are my personal experiences as an entrepreneur in the Indian high-technology space.